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任正非:华为绝不上市
Huawei’s founder rejects possibility of stock market listin ...

2014-5-4 15:39| 发布者: 悠儿| 查看: 5749| 评论: 2

摘要: Ren Zhengfei, the founder of Huawei, has described shareholders of public companies as greedy and short-termist, in a forceful rejection of the idea of listing the Chinese telecoms equipment maker.“I ...
Ren Zhengfei, the founder of Huawei, has described shareholders of public companies as greedy and short-termist, in a forceful rejection of the idea of listing the Chinese telecoms equipment maker.

“In reality, [public] shareholders are greedy and want to squeeze every bit out of a company as soon as possible,” he told a gathering of western journalists in London. “People who own this company are not greedy?.?.?.?Not listing on the stock market is one of the reasons we have overtaken our peers.”

In the rare discussion, Mr Ren said Huawei was already transparent enough in its dealings without a listing, in spite of the concerns raised in the US and Australia about connections to the Chinese state.

The debate has been reversed in recent months after documents from Edward Snowden suggested that the US National Security Agency had itself been hacking into Huawei’s corporate servers.

Mr Ren said that he had held suspicions that the company was being monitored, but used the Snowden disclosures to emphasise that nothing was being hidden by the Chinese group.

“The monitoring behaviour by the United States is within expectations,” he said. “I believe that there is no secret around myself. Huawei’s approach has [always] been open.”

Even so, he said Huawei would strengthen protection around the “higher-end technologies” being created by the group, which has become a leading provider of equipment and services in areas such as telecoms networks and smart devices.

Mr Ren’s role in the Chinese military until 1983 has caused longstanding suspicion about the involvement of the Chinese state in Huawei, which has grown rapidly from an initial investment of Rmb21,000 in 1987, to a multinational corporation that generates about $40bn in annual revenue.

The group was banned from bidding on certain national contracts in Australia, while a US congressional report raised fears about Huawei’s links with the Chinese state, although the report presented no evidence of actual wrongdoing. Huawei has been forced to curtail its involvement in the US market as a result of the suspicions.

Mr Ren said there was no need for a public listing to provide greater transparency, instead pointing to dangers of shareholdership. Huawei workers are offered a stake in the company, which Mr Ren said meant there was a “longer-term view”.

Mr Ren holds the position of chairman and maintains a veto on decisions, even though there are three rotating chief executives under him with operational control.

He has never used the right of veto, he said, instead preferring to talk to his senior management. The future leadership structure of Huawei had not been settled, he added. “Ultimately we want to find a mechanism for succession,” he said.

Mr Ren said that revenues could double in the next four years to between $70bn and $80bn. However, he ruled out making any acquisitions to boost its business in smart devices or telecoms equipment in the short term.

Huawei’s revenue rose almost 12 per cent last year to $39.5bn, generating a net profit of $3.5bn. In 2013, Huawei invested $5.1bn in research and development, and Mr Ren said it would continue to focus on developing new products.

He said Huawei would also keep investing in countries such as the UK and parts of Europe that have been more welcoming to the Chinese company. Continued investment in businesses in the region would mean that in future it would be perceived as a European company, he added.

A ‘shy’ man who regrets not fulfilling his filial duties

Ren Zhengfei provided a rare insight into the motivations of a “shy” man with almost no hobbies who has created one of the world’s largest technology groups in spite of early setbacks.

“Work and making money – there are no other hobbies,” said Mr Ren, founder of Huawei, as he described a hard early start to life in a poor family that spared little time for personal interests. “My personal life is not that colourful,” he said.

On prompting by an adviser, Mr Ren disclosed that he enjoyed reading and drinking tea – specifically, of the British afternoon variety.

Mr Ren had never spoken to the Western press until recently, which he acknowledged had created a reputation of himself as mysterious. But he said this was “maybe because I am a person who is shy.”

However, he then opened up about his personal life at a meeting in London, describing how after leaving the Chinese army in 1983, he headed to Shenzhen to start his own business.

Mr Ren was let go from the army at a period when non-combatant officers were being cut back, which he said was accepted reluctantly given the progress he had made.

A salary of $30 a month was difficult to leave behind, he added, until he got to Shenzhen and realised that workers were earnings $50 a month.

However, his initial business attempts were set back by duplicitous partners. “It turned out that I was cheated by the others in the business,” he said.

This forced him into learning about how the law worked, which led to a realisation about how to benefit from the shift happening in China from a controlled to a market economy. He grasped that the key element of business under his control was the quality of the supply chain, which began a life-long obsession with research and development.

Even so, he said that many of Huawei’s Shenzhen peers from that period had died away, making him a “moth surviving the flames”. The one word that summed up his experience of Shenzhen was “pain”, he added, as a succession of challenges during that period exhausted him.

But the biggest pain for Mr Ren is a personal one. “I didn’t fulfil my obligations to my parents,” he said, which has left him with a “life-long regret”.

中国电信设备制造商华为(Huawei)的创始人任正非坚决拒绝让华为上市,称上市公司的股东既贪婪又短视。

任正非在伦敦的一个新闻发布会上对西方记者表示:“事实上,(公众)股东是贪婪的,他们希望尽早榨干公司的每一滴利润。而拥有这家公司的人则不会那么贪婪……我们之所以能超越同业竞争对手,原因之一就是没有上市。”

在这场少见的讨论中,任正非表示,华为虽然没有上市,但在商业活动中已足够透明,尽管美国和澳大利亚仍对该公司与中国政府的关系表示关切。

近几个月来,这场争论的形势发生了逆转,原因是爱德华?斯诺登(Edward Snowden)披露的文件显示,美国国家安全局(US National Security Agency)自身一直试图侵入华为的企业服务器。

任正非表示,他曾怀疑公司受到了监听,但他借助斯诺登的爆料强调,华为没有隐藏任何东西。

他说:“美国政府的监听行为是意料之中的事。我认为,我的身边并没有什么秘密。华为的姿态(始终)是开放的。”

但他仍表示,华为将加强对公司正在开发的“高端技术”的保护。目前,华为已成为电信网络和智能终端等领域中一家领先的设备与服务提供商。

任正非曾在中国军队任职,直至1983年。这导致外界长期以来一直怀疑华为与中国政府有关联。1987年华为创立时,初始投资仅为2.1万元人民币,它现已快速成长为一家每年创造约400亿美元收入的跨国公司。

华为被禁止参与澳大利亚某些国家项目的竞标,而美国国会的一份报告则激起了市场对华为与中国政府关系的担忧,尽管这份报告并未给出任何华为存在实际违规行为的证据。受这些猜疑的影响,华为被迫在美国市场上收缩了“战线”。

任正非表示,提高公司透明度不一定要靠上市。相反,他指出了公众持股可能带来的风险。华为向员工授予公司股权,任正非指出,此举表明华为具有“长远眼光”。

任正非现任华为副董事长,对公司决策保有否决权。在他之下有三名轮值首席执行官,他们拥有公司的运营控制权。

他表示,自己从未行使过否决权,而是更倾向于和高管团队沟通交流。他补充称,华为未来的领导架构尚未确定,但“最终我们希望找到一种接班机制”。

任正非表示,未来四年公司收入可能增长一倍,达到700亿至800亿美元。但他排除了在短期之内为了提升智能终端或电信设备业务而展开收购的可能性。

华为去年的收入增长近12%,至395亿美元,净利润为35亿美元。2013年,华为在研发领域的投资达51亿美元。任正非表示,公司将继续致力于开发新产品。

他说,华为还将继续在一些国家展开投资,比如英国以及对华为一直持更欢迎态度的部分欧洲国家。他补充称,持续对该地区业务进行投资意味着,未来华为会被视作一家欧洲公司。

一个遗憾未能尽孝的“害羞”男人

虽然任正非早年经历坎坷,但他却建起了全球最大的一家科技集团。他几乎没有任何业余爱好,为人们了解一个“害羞”男人的创业动机提供了一个罕见的视角。

“除了工作和赚钱,没什么别的爱好,”这位华为的创始人在谈起自己人生早期阶段的艰苦经历时说。任正非生于贫寒之家,没多少时间发展个人爱好。他说:“我的个人生活并不那么丰富多彩。”

在一名顾问的提醒下,任正非透露自己喜欢阅读和喝茶,尤其是英式下午茶。

任正非之前从不接受西方媒体采访,直到最近才“破戒”。他承认,这给自己蒙上了一层神秘的色彩。但他表示,这“可能是因为我是个害羞的人”。

不过,他后来在伦敦的一次会议上披露了自己的个人生活,谈到自己在1983年退伍后前往深圳创业的历程。

任正非是在中国军队裁减非作战人员时期被迫离开部队的。他说,当时不太愿意接受这一改变,因为自己那会儿在部队里干得还不错。

他补充道,一开始很舍不得当兵时每月30美元的工资,直到去深圳后发现当地工人每月挣50美元才改变了想法。

然而,他的首次创业尝试却因合伙人使诈而遇挫。他说:“结果证明,我被合伙人骗了。”

这迫使他去了解法律是如何运作的,他也因此认识到,如何从当时中国由计划经济向市场经济的转型中获利。他领悟到,在自己管控下的企业,关键在于供应链的质量,并从此开始把工作重心放在研发上。

尽管如此,与华为同一时期在深圳成立的许多同业公司还是倒闭了。任正非说,这让他成了一只“扑火余生的飞蛾”。他补充道,如果用一个词来总结他在深圳的历程,那就是“痛苦”——那段日子里,接连不断的挑战令他感到精疲力尽。

但他最大的痛苦是个人方面的。他说,“我没有对父母尽到孝道”,这给他留下了“终身的遗憾”。

译者/何黎

1

路过

雷人
4

鲜花

鸡蛋

刚表态过的朋友 (5 人)

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引用 风中的云 2014-5-12 00:44
digitmap: 原文是中文。不知道翻译成英文是老外还是国人。
原文是英文,中文是翻译的。
引用 digitmap 2014-5-9 08:04
原文是中文。不知道翻译成英文是老外还是国人。

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